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LID919

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  1. [WIP] Dark Brotherhood Chronicles: Consequences

    I had completely forgotten this website existed. Just got the email about the SSE Beta for The Brotherhood of Old and I remembered this project. I'm assuming due to the last activity on this thread being from 2016 that Dark Brotherhood Chronicles is officially dead?
  2. Paid Mods for Skyrim

    That is a sort of system that I would agree with. When I first saw the announcement, I originally thought it'd be good for modders overall. Compensation for the modders would be a good thing. However, I am fearful that modders will slowly shift from providing free mods, and an option to pay, to free versions and premium versions with a fuller featureset (which appears to be already occurring) into outright dropping support for free mods entirely. I think the bandcamp style system would be better, as the modders would be able to get compensation through a more convenient interface than a donation button on the Nexus. Donating via Steam Wallet would be easier and encourage a lot of support, especially given that the advent of the Steam Community Market allows users to sell their virtual items for Wallet funds. Many users will have spare change in their Wallets, and I'm sure many would be willing to give to their favorite modders if the system for doing so were this convenient. With the system in its current form however, it could thin the waters of free mods immensely. If that occurs, then far fewer individuals will become introduced to modding in the first place.
  3. Paid Mods for Skyrim

    Sorry about that, searched "Steam Workshop" and didn't find this thread. Thanks for bringing me in here. Been poking around and it seems that Dark Creations is against this. Hopefully enough voices speak up that this doesn't progress too far, or at least stays in the realm of Steam's classical 999 sword mods.
  4. Paid Mods for Skyrim

    I just got news today on Steam that modders can now charge for the mods they make. When I first started looking through the listings, I thought it was only going to be composed of the usual kind of filler on Steam: Nine hundred and ninety nine different swords. However, the listings included large and popular mods such as Wet and Cold, Arissa the Wandering Rogue, and Midas Magic. In a way, I thought this could be a good thing: giving more support to the modders who have worked so hard to bring us high quality gameplay enhancements. Comparing the Nexus versions of the mods to the paid Workshop versions, it seems like the Steam version is a "premium" version of sorts, boasting a few extra features and enhancements. However, I do worry that at some point modders might just in large abandon free releases, abandon support of the Nexus and other such repositories, and move over to paid Steam mods. I run over one hundred mods each in Oblivion and Skyrim, even at $0.99 per mod, it would still be ridiculous to have to pay that much for the customized Elder Scrolls experience of old. Some mods charge far more than that, Midas is being sold for $5.99. Modding has always been a hobby, not a career. Something that one pours their heart and soul into, hoping that the masses will find their work impressive enough to endorse, review, etc. Furthermore, there have been plenty of occasions where I have tried a mod, only to not like it and remove it immediately. If this new system does not feature a trial system or something of the likes, then I cannot see a future where I would ever trust a Workshop mod. In addition, if there is a trial system, this will usher in a whole new era of Mod Piracy. We all know how vulnerable ESP files and other game data is, there have been far to many incidents of piracy of completely free mods. When an individual pirates a free mod, they become immediately banned from the modding community at large, as it is a terrible act of disrespect. However, in an environment where mods cost money, pirates will explode in popularity. Do we attack pirates of movies we torrent? No, we thank them half the time. The same thing will end up happening here, even if there is no trial system, the files are too vulnerable, they can be stolen with ease. Mods have always been the reason why Elder Scrolls for PC has been so popular. I have had many friends repurchase the game after owning it on console, such that they might access mods. Not to mention that modding is what keeps the games popular for years and years. I repurchased my copy of Oblivion, which I to this day still enjoy greatly, such that I could get Bethesda's micro-DLC (Spell Tomes, Frostcrag. . .) in the Steam Game of the Year Edition Deluxe, features that I missed in my original copy of Oblivion Game of the Year edition on disk. If the free modding communities die out or significantly diminish, I can see a future where Elder Scrolls for PC loses out its popularity, changing from the games that we keep playing for a decade after release, to something that we occasionally purchase a new DLC for, and eventually tire of. At the moment, I believe that the future looks dark for Elder Scrolls VI. What are your opinions on the matter?
  5. Mod Organizer

    I've been using Mod Organizer for a while now. Though it has its issues and quirks, I find it to be a very good tool overall. I've been using it for both Skyrim and Oblivion, and have not noticed any performance hit even with having over one hundred mods on each game. However, I could imagine there to be a slowdown when using tools through Mod Organizer, given the virtual file system's inherent overhead. I find it to be a very valuable tool for installing mods such as texture packs, music packs and the likes, and organizing them down to the Install Order level; which came in very handy when I found two music replacer mods I liked: One that adds a bunch of really nice ambient musics, but no combat music, and another that adds some really nice combat music, but the ambient music it adds is not up to par with the first mod. Were I doing things manually, I'd need to backup my Skyrim/Data/Music directory, then install the second music replacer, then install the first. But with Mod Organizer, i simply install both mods through the organizer, and can drag and drop them into the proper install order. This is a very simple example, but you can see the extendability of this for larger install order conflicts. The virtual data system makes things very nice for testing out new texture replacers, or mods that replace scripts, without the need to backup all the originals and revert if the mod is not liked. It makes it also very simple to switch between them and turn them on and off, especially with the Profiles feature. The profiles feature is a very nice feature for me, allowing me to switch between vanilla, a lite build with only a few mods, a test profile for testing new mods in isolation, and my main SkyRe profile with the massive modlist. The system has LOOT built in, and it seems to work fairly well. Though there is currently a bug in the Oblivion version that I am having trouble diagnosing. The Skyrim version however, has been running fine since the last time I tested. Also with the profiles feature are nice little things like savegames local to each profile (something I used to do manually, saving my plugins.txt in a directory with a bunch of saves, but now is far quicker) and INI configurations also local to each profile. Overall, it is a lot of little changes that mostly are convenience, but make the modding experience far quicker and easier. That being said, I am always sure to disable Mod Organizer whilst doing development on a mod. I want to have total control over what ESP file is being created, where it's going, what is overwriting what, and though Mod Organizer can work with this, I find it simpler here to just do things manually. When modding Oblivion, I am sure to disable Mod Organizer, and just do my work via obse_loader.exe -editor. EDIT: I forgot to mention in regards to development, Mod Organizer lacks such tools as ESMify self. Wry Bash is still needed for mod development. Some final words on Mod Organizer. Although it claims to be able to manage Steam installed mods, this feature has not been implemented correctly as of yet, and so Steam mods will remain "unmanaged". Also, if deciding to use mod organizer, be prepared for several hours of installing, as it is usually easiest to revert your game to a completely Vanilla state, then install all mods through Mod Organizer. This tends to keep everything set up so that you can take the greatest advantage of its features. It is not necessary, as when I first started using Mod Organizer, I just installed new mods through it, and used it for profile specific load order, INI, and Savegames. But a while back I completely refactored my Skyrim build to use Mod Organizer. Once I picked up Anthology, I started my new Oblivion build in Mod Organizer from the start, and it has been a fantastic experience. That's what I have to say on the matter. The tool is not quite perfect, and I've been hoping to find the time to write one or two plugins to make the experience run slightly smoother, but overall, it works very well.
  6. Scripting Help for Vampire Feed Power

    I got the whole thing working out. For future reference for anyone looking to accomplish something similar, here is what I did for the Crime portion. I set up a quest script with variables "prevCrimeGold" and "Run". When the player is undetected, I set prevCrimeGold to the player's current crime gold, make the kill, then set run to 1. The quest script then runs, and sets the players crime gold to their previous crime gold three times. I ran it three times because running it once sometimes missed the timing of the game's crime detection script, and the 1000 murder bounty would be added after the quest script ran. This solution is not perfect, I could see problems arising if you force feed then go on a crime spree in the six seconds of the crimeWatch script's runtime, but it works well enough so far. The force feed script looks like: And the crime watch script looks like: So there's that.
  7. Scripting Help for Vampire Feed Power

    Thank you. My Google-Fu must be getting rusty, because I never found any references to "GetSleeping", I'll try harder next time.
  8. I got the whole thing working out. For future reference for anyone looking to accomplish something similar, here is what I did to blame the player of a killing, without making it a crime. I set up a quest script with variables "prevCrimeGold" and "Run". When the player is undetected, I set prevCrimeGold to the player's current crime gold, make the kill, then set run to 1. The quest script then runs, and sets the players crime gold to their previous crime gold three times. I ran it three times because running it once sometimes missed the timing of the game's crime detection script, and the 1000 murder bounty would be added after the quest script ran. This solution is not perfect, I could see problems arising if you force feed then go on a crime spree in the six seconds of the crimeWatch script's runtime, but it works well enough so far. The force feed script looks like: And the crime watch script looks like: So there's that. Original Post:
  9. Dark Brotherhood Chronicles: Consequences

    Thanks for all the replies, very glad to see that development is still active on this. New question. I've been playing Oblivion again, and while traveling in the Jerall Mountains, near Ninedava, I came across something called "Frozen Door to Laxon's Tower Lobby". I checked the refid and found it came from Awakening. I unlocked the door via console, went inside, and found a cozy little tower, and an Ayleid ruin with "Dark Brotherhood Researchers". The place looked quite interesting; is this an area that we will see in Consequences?
  10. My apologies if this has been asked before, but is part II of Dark Brotherhood Chronicles still under work? I just picked up Elder Scrolls Anthology, and so have been re-downloading all the mods I used to use for Oblivion. I came to Awakening's page on the nexus, and found the link to these forums. I could not find mention of any progress on the sequel, so I thought I would ask. Even after nearly a decade, Oblivion still is my favorite game. Though I enjoy Skyrim and the Fallout games, Oblivion will always be my number one, thanks in no small part to the incredible collection of talent that is the modding community. I loved Awakening on the first playthrough, and was saddened when I saw that the next part of the story had yet to be released. I would love to see this story completed in one way or another. Will this happen?
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