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      I have been doing some housekeeping lately and I've noticed that I had a lot of orphaned attachments. Attachments get orphaned when the PM or post is deleted without removing the attachment first. Deleting a PM or post does not delete the attachment and the file or image remain on the server. I'd like to ask all members to go through their attachments and delete any attachments you don't need anymore or those that have been orphaned. Where can I get a list of my attachments? Click on your display name in the upper right corner of the forums and pick "My Attachments" from the drop-down list. How can I tell an attachment is orphaned? If the PM has been deleted, you'll see a message like this in your attachment list: Unfortunately there is no message if the post has been deleted, so please check your old posts. We do purge old birthday threads every once in a while. Also some hosted projects have been shut down, so you may have orphaned attachments on one of those locations. Thanks!
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Paid Mods for Skyrim

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Reposted from BSF
 

 

From Bethesda Blog
 

We’ve had a long and excellent relationship with our good friends at Valve. We worked together to make the Workshop a huge part of Skyrim, and we’re excited that something we’ve been working together on for a long time is finally happening. You can now charge for the mods you create.
 
Unlike other curated games on Steam that allow users to sell their creations, this will be the first game with an open market. It will not be curated by us or Valve. It was essential to us that our fans decide what they want to create, what they want to download, and what they want to charge.
 
Many of our fans have been modding our games since Morrowind, for over 10 years. They now have the opportunity to earn money doing what they love – and all fans have a new way to support their favorite mod authors. We’ve also updated Skyrim and the Creation Kit with new features to help support paid mods including the ability to upload master files, adding more categories and removing filesize limit restrictions.
 
What does this mean for you?
 
As a modder, you now have the option of listing your creations at a price determined by you. Or, you can continue to share your projects for free. For those shopping for new mods, Valve is making sure you can try any mod risk free.
 
For full details on these changes to the Skyrim Workshop, check out Steam’s announcement page and FAQ.
 
Modding has been important to all our games for such a long time. We try to create worlds that come alive and you can make your own, but it’s in modding where it truly does.
 
Thanks again for all your incredible support over the years. We hope steps like this breathe new life into Skyrim for everyone.
 
- Bethesda Game Studios

 
You can also learn more on Steam, including a FAQ you'll want to read, right here.

 

 

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For convenience, here's the Valve FAQ on paid mods....
 

For Creators
 
Q. How do I set the price of my item?
A. When posting a new mod or item to the Skyrim Workshop you’ll be presented with some controls and a checklist to get your item listed for sale.
 
Q. How much should I charge for my item?
A. The appropriate price for your mod, map, or item will depend on a number of factors. Here are some things to think about:
1. How many similar items are already available for sale or for free?
2. How much unique content have you created? Is this something which is hard for others to do?
3. How many hours of playtime does your experience offer?
 
Q. Can I change the price of my item once posted?
A. Yes, but there may be limitations on how frequently you can adjust your price.
 
Q. What if I see someone posting content I've created?
A. If someone has copied your work, please use the DMCA takedown notice.
 
Q. Can I include someone else's mod in my mod?
A. The Steam Workshop makes it easy to allocate and approve portions of your item’s revenue with other collaborators or co-authors.
 
Q. Can I delete my Workshop item?
A. You can stop selling and delist your Workshop item, but it cannot be deleted. If there are customers have purchased your item, they will need continued access to the mod as well as your Workshop page so they can reference the items they have purchased.
 
Q. How do I get paid for sales of my item?
A. Please see Workshop Revenue FAQ
 
Q. Can I sell the mods I’ve made for other games in the Steam Workshop?
A. It is up to the developers or publisher of each game to decide if paid Workshop mods are appropriate for their game. You will only be able to sell mods for a game in the Steam Workshop if the developers have enabled that functionality.
 
Q. Can I sell a mod that contains artwork or content from another game or movie?
A. You must have the necessary rights to post any content that you post to the Steam Workshop, whether it is for sale or not. If you upload copyrighted content that you or your contributors do not have the rights to distribute, then you may forfeit all earned revenue from the item, may be liable for damages and compensation, and may be banned from future participation in this Workshop or the Steam Community in general.


 
For Players
 
Q. Can I get a refund?
A. If you discover that a mod does not work for you, or does not meet your expectations based on the description of the mod, you can get a refund within 24 hours of your purchase. You can view the full refund policy here.
 
Q. How much do paid mods cost?
A. The prices for mods are set by their authors, and depend on their size, complexity, and the type of content. Unique quests that may contain dozens of hours of playtime will probably cost more than a new hat for your character.
 
Q. Where can I find the mods I've purchased?
A. In your Steam Inventory
 
Q. Why can't I rate all the mods I see in the Steam Workshop?
A. For paid Workshop items, you need to have purchased the item before you can rate it.
 
Q. What happens if a mod I bought breaks?
A. Sometimes one mod may modify the same files as another mod, or a particular combination of mods may cause unexpected outcomes. If you find that mod has broken or is behaving unexpectedly, it is best to post politely on the Workshop item's page and let the mod author know the details of what you are seeing.
 
Q. Couldn’t I already buy items made in the Workshop?
A. While a few games support voting for items to be integrated by game developers and sold in-game as items or DLC, there hasn’t until now been a way to buy items directly through the Workshop. With paid mods and items becoming available for sale on the Workshop itself, it means more high quality items, mods, and experiences can be made available for your favorite games.
 
Q. How do I play a Skyrim mod I’ve purchased or subscribed to?
A. Once you’re acquired a new mod, simply launch Skyrim from your Steam library. When the launcher appears, you’ll notice status text on the lower-left as your game downloads and installs or updates new content. Once that’s done, you’re ready to go!

You can also use the “Data Files†portion of the launcher to activate or deactivate specific mods. If you’re unsure how to access new content in-game (such as figuring out which in-game vendor carries Lydia’s new hat) it’s best to check the Workshop page for that mod to see if the author has provided any clues or instructions.

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I just got news today on Steam that modders can now charge for the mods they make. When I first started looking through the listings, I thought it was only going to be composed of the usual kind of filler on Steam: Nine hundred and ninety nine different swords. However, the listings included large and popular mods such as Wet and Cold, Arissa the Wandering Rogue, and Midas Magic. In a way, I thought this could be a good thing: giving more support to the modders who have worked so hard to bring us high quality gameplay enhancements. Comparing the Nexus versions of the mods to the paid Workshop versions, it seems like the Steam version is a "premium" version of sorts, boasting a few extra features and enhancements. However, I do worry that at some point modders might just in large abandon free releases, abandon support of the Nexus and other such repositories, and move over to paid Steam mods.

 

I run over one hundred mods each in Oblivion and Skyrim, even at $0.99 per mod, it would still be ridiculous to have to pay that much for the customized Elder Scrolls experience of old. Some mods charge far more than that, Midas is being sold for $5.99. Modding has always been a hobby, not a career. Something that one pours their heart and soul into, hoping that the masses will find their work impressive enough to endorse, review, etc.

 

Furthermore, there have been plenty of occasions where I have tried a mod, only to not like it and remove it immediately. If this new system does not feature a trial system or something of the likes, then I cannot see a future where I would ever trust a Workshop mod. In addition, if there is a trial system, this will usher in a whole new era of Mod Piracy. We all know how vulnerable ESP files and other game data is, there have been far to many incidents of piracy of completely free mods. When an individual pirates a free mod, they become immediately banned from the modding community at large, as it is a terrible act of disrespect. However, in an environment where mods cost money, pirates will explode in popularity. Do we attack pirates of movies we torrent? No, we thank them half the time. The same thing will end up happening here, even if there is no trial system, the files are too vulnerable, they can be stolen with ease.

 

Mods have always been the reason why Elder Scrolls for PC has been so popular. I have had many friends repurchase the game after owning it on console, such that they might access mods. Not to mention that modding is what keeps the games popular for years and years. I repurchased my copy of Oblivion, which I to this day still enjoy greatly, such that I could get Bethesda's micro-DLC (Spell Tomes, Frostcrag. . .) in the Steam Game of the Year Edition Deluxe, features that I missed in my original copy of Oblivion Game of the Year edition on disk. If the free modding communities die out or significantly diminish, I can see a future where Elder Scrolls for PC loses out its popularity, changing from the games that we keep playing for a decade after release, to something that we occasionally purchase a new DLC for, and eventually tire of. At the moment, I believe that the future looks dark for Elder Scrolls VI.

 

What are your opinions on the matter?

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Hmm, I'm really not sure where to stand on this. On the one hand it's great that authors can earn some money from their creations, but on the other I'm worried about what this might mean for the community as a whole in the future. I think I'll stay in wait-and-see mode for the time being.

 

Still, an interesting development.

 

EDIT:

I just got news today on Steam that modders can now charge for the mods they make. When I first started looking through the listings, I thought it was only going to be composed of the usual kind of filler on Steam: Nine hundred and ninety nine different swords. However, the listings included large and popular mods such as Wet and Cold, Arissa the Wandering Rogue, and Midas Magic. In a way, I thought this could be a good thing: giving more support to the modders who have worked so hard to bring us high quality gameplay enhancements. Comparing the Nexus versions of the mods to the paid Workshop versions, it seems like the Steam version is a "premium" version of sorts, boasting a few extra features and enhancements. However, I do worry that at some point modders might just in large abandon free releases, abandon support of the Nexus and other such repositories, and move over to paid Steam mods.

 

<snip>

I too noticed the difference. Wet and Cold on Nexus is on version 1.422, while the Steam version is on 2.0. It's a little worrying that we may have to pay for the best version of a mod, especially if it contains important bug fixes.

Edited by brucoms

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Threads merged and off-topic posts deleted.

 

This has disaster written all over it, at least in the short term. Short term, I expect people to charge for frivolous things and trying to rip folks off. Long term, we might see blocs get together and try to control the whole modding scene and run the rest of the guys out of town.

 

I predict an uproar and the creation of factions. This won't be pretty and may resemble things in the free software world.

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I'm not sure how I feel about this yet. I will say that life just got a lot more complicated. I'm working with a team on several Skyrim mods - now we have to decide if we're going to sell our mods.

 

I do feel some pressure with this announcement though. I'm still planning on doing Skyrim XP and now I'm afraid someone will beat me to it. *sigh*

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All of my work is and always will be free as in beer and speech. I need to implement the free documentation license PDQ on my other stuff...

 

My philosophy is that I do this stuff not for financial gain but because I want to do it and because it may help others. It'll be interesting to see how this progresses. In the early days, various app stores were a mess with exploitation. People charging for things that didn't do squat and misled folks. It's gotten better but it's still pretty prevalent.

 

To quote, "I've got a bad feeling about this."

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Threads merged and off-topic posts deleted.

 

Sorry about that, searched "Steam Workshop" and didn't find this thread. Thanks for bringing me in here.

 

Been poking around and it seems that Dark Creations is against this. Hopefully enough voices speak up that this doesn't progress too far, or at least stays in the realm of Steam's classical 999 sword mods.

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I like the idea. Modders work hard and deserve some kickback. For someone like me that is trying to make a career out of game development, I see this as something positive. Sure it's a hobby for most, but why shouldn't you be compensated for your hard work if you want to be?

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Yeah a voluntary donation system would be better. As someone pointed out in the Bethesda thread, they are running over 100 mods. Even if each mod only cost $0.99, that would still be $100! When you think of it that way, you see how expensive it would be.

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I like the idea. Modders work hard and deserve some kickback. For someone like me that is trying to make a career out of game development, I see this as something positive. Sure it's a hobby for most, but why shouldn't you be compensated for your hard work if you want to be?

 

I can understand wanting to recoup your costs, but would you pay for mods?

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I like the idea. Modders work hard and deserve some kickback. For someone like me that is trying to make a career out of game development, I see this as something positive. Sure it's a hobby for most, but why shouldn't you be compensated for your hard work if you want to be?

 

 

I can understand wanting to recoup your costs, but would you pay for mods?

If they're well made and reasonably priced, absolutely. Work from someone like ThirteenOranges, for example, is more than worth an admission price.

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Can you imagine us charging for Dark Brotherhood Chronicles? We've had about 20 people working on it over the years, plus a dozen or so voice actors. My head hurts just thinking about it!

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My Internet just crapped out and posted that 3 times. Sorry could that be cleaned up please?

Edited by Vincent

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Wait, how does this affect the EULA? Specifically the part about not being allowed to sell the mods? As far as I know, that hasn't been updated. Arthmoor, have you seen anything on that?

 

Also, how does this affect other sites? Are they allowed to charge or just Steam? The FAQ doesn't cover these points.

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I imagine this would be a Steam only thing. The lawyers must be having a ball with this.

 

I think I'm going to test the waters with this for TBO. Perhaps have one version up that's free, and another that is paid, and let people pay if they want to.

 

It would be nice if they let us do a bandcamp sort of thing with it though. Have it free, but let people pay whatever amount they want for it if they want to.

Edited by Vincent

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Someone on Beth said that they saw mods listed as pay what you want. I also think the two-site thing is a good idea. Then it would be more like a donation thing. Although Bethesda/Valve get 75% of the proceeds, so you won't see much. Also, apparently you only see the proceeds once your pay-out is $100 or more. Somebody dug that up from the Valve FAQ.

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I imagine this would be a Steam only thing. The lawyers must be having a ball with this.

 

I think I'm going to test the waters with this for TBO. Perhaps have one version up that's free, and another that is paid, and let people pay if they want to.

 

It would be nice if they let us do a bandcamp sort of thing with it though. Have it free, but let people pay whatever amount they want for it if they want to.

 

That is a sort of system that I would agree with. When I first saw the announcement, I originally thought it'd be good for modders overall. Compensation for the modders would be a good thing. However, I am fearful that modders will slowly shift from providing free mods, and an option to pay, to free versions and premium versions with a fuller featureset (which appears to be already occurring) into outright dropping support for free mods entirely. I think the bandcamp style system would be better, as the modders would be able to get compensation through a more convenient interface than a donation button on the Nexus. Donating via Steam Wallet would be easier and encourage a lot of support, especially given that the advent of the Steam Community Market allows users to sell their virtual items for Wallet funds. Many users will have spare change in their Wallets, and I'm sure many would be willing to give to their favorite modders if the system for doing so were this convenient.

 

With the system in its current form however, it could thin the waters of free mods immensely. If that occurs, then far fewer individuals will become introduced to modding in the first place.

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We all know that deep down that this is really a system to line their pockets in an area where they never could before. I don't mind the little kickback though. Although the $100 limit is kind of silly. At the end of the day, really, I think a majority of the mods that will be using this system will probably be comprised of 95% if not 100% of Zenimax assets, so them taking a huge cut isn't that odd. Now mods that use mostly their own assets, that I can see being an issue with some people.

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