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Malonn

Anyone run a flavor of Linux

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I'm considering going with a dual-boot of Ubuntu and (naturally) Windows.  See what ol' Linux is talking about.  But, I'm wondering if anyone runs Linux and WINE.  I've read WINE is not 100%.  What are y'all's experience with WINE?  If there are any experiences with it...

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Posted (edited)

*waves*

 

For fifteen years! I like it a lot but the documentation sucks for more interesting setups even though the back ends explicitly support them. :P

 

Example: there's zero documentation on Wayland except for basic API documentation. No documentation on the setup at all. It's kind of important since it's supposed to replace X11! I have yet to get Wayland to work right as a result. :P

 

Also:

 

Nvidia's drivers don't fully work for Linux if you don't have a Quadro device. If you don't mind the lack of SLI support and some other features, you may want to try nouveau if you have a Nvidia device. I would but my setup isn't supported by it and only partially by the Nvidia drivers. It's kind of silly but I'm making do.

Edited by Visceral Moonlight

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What's your favorite flavor of Linux?  A virgin should probably go with Ubuntu, eh?  I've read about virtualization software built in (KVM?) that allows you to run Windows in a virtual environment.  But ti can be a kind of hassle.  You need two graphics cards (or one on-die, one discrete), separate monitor connections, etc.  But, it offers great performance once configured, so I read.  But I'm wondering about WINE; would I be generally satisfied?  So there's different versions of WINE?  I'll have to look into that.  I do run Nvidia.  So I may need to be careful?  I read that Linux has stable, accepted driver versions you can download--it may not be the latest and greatest, but it sould be relatively hassle-free.  I'd love to hear more.  I'm considering downloading today and setting up a dual boot.

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I've always used either Red Hat/Fedora or Arch, myself. Fedora is less manual than Arch but moreso than Ubuntu but, recently, they've started doing silly things such as breaking dependency cycles and not fixing them for a year.

 

Wine can be hit or miss and it doesn't work well with DRM like SecuROM but can work well with Steam if set up properly.

 

If you only have a single video card with one GPU on it and not a multi-GPU card with a single monitor, than I recommend nouveau. Otherwise, the Nvidia driver is probably your best option. If you go that route and mess with Surround (and get it working), I'd be interested in seeing the config file since I've been fighting with a cryptic error code when trying to set it up. Like I said, documentation is pretty poor. :P

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We're running Ubuntu on the server and that's what I would recommend. It's the most-used flavour of Linux due to its ease of use. One thing to aware of is that there are two very different versions. The server edition, which is what we use, doesn't have any of the GUI stuff. However Ubuntu also has a desktop version which comes with a nice GUI and various utilities. That's the version you'll want to grab.

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I've always used either Red Hat/Fedora or Arch, myself. Fedora is less manual than Arch but moreso than Ubuntu but, recently, they've started doing silly things such as breaking dependency cycles and not fixing them for a year.

 

Wine can be hit or miss and it doesn't work well with DRM like SecuROM but can work well with Steam if set up properly.

 

If you only have a single video card with one GPU on it and not a multi-GPU card with a single monitor, than I recommend nouveau. Otherwise, the Nvidia driver is probably your best option. If you go that route and mess with Surround (and get it working), I'd be interested in seeing the config file since I've been fighting with a cryptic error code when trying to set it up. Like I said, documentation is pretty poor. :P

 

Hit or miss... I definitely won't be ditching Windows anytime soon.  But I guess one can't know the details without trying.  I'm running a single GPU card (GTX 1080), so I'll look into nouveau.  No surround here; single QHD monitor.

 

We're running Ubuntu on the server and that's what I would recommend. It's the most-used flavour of Linux due to its ease of use. One thing to aware of is that there are two very different versions. The server edition, which is what we use, doesn't have any of the GUI stuff. However Ubuntu also has a desktop version which comes with a nice GUI and various utilities. That's the version you'll want to grab.

 

Yeah that confirms what I've been reading.  Beginner friendly == Ubuntu.  I'll probably start with it.  It still has a powerful Terminal, eh?

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As with any distro, you install what you want. :)

 

My personal recommendation if you go with Ubuntu is Xubuntu as it's the most flexible flavor. However, you can still install anything from regular Ubuntu, the flavors just give you a default setup. The Xfce Terminal is also one of the best out there.

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I go with Ubuntu "official". When discussing Linux, especially the various flavours, VM and I rarely agree. :lol: Mind you, I have to stick to standard when it comes to running a server. If you're doing a desktop, you're free to pick from the features that you want.

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When I said a "flavor" of Linux, I was just writing "colorfully".  Turns out there are "flavors" of Ubuntu.  I'll have to read to see what's what with each one.  Is it just a GUI thing?

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Yes and no. I would go with Ubuntu Desktop Complete. The other options involve different networking features for enterprise, or large corporations, different tools for developers and a different software configuration for education. Basically the different versions dictate the packages that will be included and how they are configured by default.

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Posted (edited)

Xubuntu uses Xfce by default, Ubuntu uses Unity. That's basically the only difference. Xfce is very flexible and can be made to look like Unity.

 

Xubuntu is an official version. Ubuntu offers various official versions, each corresponding to a different desktop environment, to make setup a bit easier. Here's what they offer: https://www.ubuntu.com/download/ubuntu-flavours :)

 

It's mostly personal preference but I just find Xfce easier to work with. It's also the only DE that properly supports multiple monitors across multiple video cards. All the others either crash or won't use the card attached to the slave card. :P

Edited by Visceral Moonlight

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Xubuntu uses Xfce by default, Ubuntu uses Unity. That's basically the only difference. Xfce is very flexible and can be made to look like Unity.

 

Xubuntu is an official version. Ubuntu offers various official versions, each corresponding to a different desktop environment, to make setup a bit easier. Here's what they offer: https://www.ubuntu.com/download/ubuntu-flavours :)

 

It's mostly personal preference but I just find Xfce easier to work with. It's also the only DE that properly supports multiple monitors across multiple video cards. All the others either crash or won't use the card attached to the slave card. :P

 

YIKES! See I only focus on the server stuff, so I don't need to look at all that... stuff. Good luck Malonn. I bet you didn't think your question was that bloody complicated. :rofl:

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I know it would be a change from Windows.  I read some about Linux, but I certainly did not know there are this many options and choices.  I'm going to go with straight up Ubuntu to pop my cherry.  Heck, I may not even like Linux... it sure does sound neat though.

 

Now, VM, with these "GNOME", Budgie", etc., you are talking about theme packs, right?  UI type stuff?

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Posted (edited)

They're desktop environments, which define how you interact with things using the UI. All those I mentioned being forks of GNOME are based on the same code but with their own tweaks to it. :)

Edited by Visceral Moonlight

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Gnome was a really popular desktop before all those variants were created. It's mostly a question of look and feel, but I remember the text editor was GEdit, which I really liked. I generally found the desktop frustrating though, but I have no experience with any of these new varieties so I can't comment on them. I usually just wound up opening the terminal window and doing most of my work from there.

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Posted (edited)

GNOME 3 was nigh unusable for a lot of people, so the variants came about. Cinnamon is probably the best of the variants, if you can get it to work. It tends to crash for me, not sure why. Gedit isn't that good anymore as they removed session support for some weird reason so I switched to Geany, which doesn't have multiple window support. :(

Edited by Visceral Moonlight

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Well, my initial impression of Ubuntu is not very positive.  For an OS that is touted to "just work", it doesn't.  I'm having a display issue.  I can boot to the login screen, but if I log in, I get artifacts and a black screen which usually takes me back to the login screen (sometimes just stays black), rinse and repeat.  So, I go to the terminal (Ctrl+Alt+F1).  I'm assuming it's a display driver issue, so I try and add repositories for the latest nvidia drivers.  No problem.  Next I go to install the latest driver supported by the repo I found (381, I believe), but it errors out during installation--says "Bug: Bad rss-counter state".  So that's where I am.  Googling that error.  I know that I have to try another package because trying the same one gives an error that it was interrupted and that I need to run dpkg --configure -a which FUCKING takes forever.  I tried it once and said it would be easier and quicker to just reinstall.  Which I did.

 

So, now I'm off to Google to find out what this error is.  Then try and find a different nvidia ppa and try it.  Then if I can install a new driver, I have to see if that's even the problem to begin with.  Shit...

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Posted (edited)

i7 5820K.  Yeah, it doesn't have an on-die GPU.

 

I have the official ppa--graphics-drivers/ppa, so I'll run into a dead end trying to find anything else.  Now, why won't it install?  It has to be via the terminal.

Edited by Malonn

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This is a silly question but is your network properly configured?

 

On installing a distribution from scratch, I often forget to configure it before installing packages and spend hours trying to figure out why it doesn't work.

 

Does pinging a site work?

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