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    • AndalayBay

      Orphan Attachments   07/31/2018

      I have been doing some housekeeping lately and I've noticed that I had a lot of orphaned attachments. Attachments get orphaned when the PM or post is deleted without removing the attachment first. Deleting a PM or post does not delete the attachment and the file or image remain on the server. I'd like to ask all members to go through their attachments and delete any attachments you don't need anymore or those that have been orphaned. Where can I get a list of my attachments? Click on your display name in the upper right corner of the forums and pick "My Attachments" from the drop-down list. How can I tell an attachment is orphaned? If the PM has been deleted, you'll see a message like this in your attachment list: Unfortunately there is no message if the post has been deleted, so please check your old posts. We do purge old birthday threads every once in a while. Also some hosted projects have been shut down, so you may have orphaned attachments on one of those locations. Thanks!
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Malonn

Programming Languages

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One more thing: if you really want to understand memory and how computers process instructions, learn assembler. I took a course in 370 Assembler. I would have failed miserably if it wasn’t for Jimi helping me write the final programming exercise. Not the exam of course, just an assignment.

In assembly programming, you have to place the data on the stack and then call each instruction to act on it and move it on the stack.

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Good info, AB!  Love it.  I will look into (I thought it was-) assembly.  I believe it's a close as we can get to machine code for people telling the computer what to do, right?  Old BIOS's used to be written in it, right?  Until UEFI when they switched to C# or C++?

So assembly (assembler) is much more involved?  I found a cool site: Code.org.  I will be perusing their material, of course.

What would you think would be a good app to write for Oblivion?  I've toyed with modding preparation streamlining (streamlining PyFFing meshes, DDSopting textures, etc.), but everyone may not be as detailed about modding their games.

Thanks for your help.

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Assembler or assembly is as low as you can get. Even today it’s used when you need a module that operates really fast. As you say, it’s basically machine language. Your next best bet is C (no sharps or pluses). Modern languages have a lot of overheard. They usually perform just fine once they’re compiled.

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Assembly is hard to look at.  That's waaay down the road if I ever decide to disassemble things and reverse them.  But AB said it's good for understanding how a program uses memory.  But I'm thinking a quick tut on it should be enlightening--I don't want to dive into the deep end on that one quite yet.

I'll definitely look into Pascal.  But for now I kinda happened on Python 3x.  Programmers like it; listening to AB, it's highly object-based; it's said to be easy to pick up; and I stumbled upon an interesting tutorial.  So, what the hell, why not see what's what.  I have the runtime and an IDE installed and am writing away.  Quite fun, I say.

I'm going to look into BASIC too.

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If you do look into assembler, try to find one for a simple processor. Don’t dive into the language for modern processors. Believe it or not, we still have a 6502 microprocessor that has a very basic set of instructions. It’s 40 years old, I think. :rofl: Yep, here’s the wiki article. It’s a whopping 8 bits. I’ll take a picture once we get it unpacked. We even have the chips to expand its abilities.

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Not mine! Jimi’s. He’s 9 years older than me. :D

I took a course in university on microprocessor programming. I think it was the 6802. That’s when I discovered Jimi had a 6502 and I was able to use it for practice. The instruction set was smaller, but it would have still helped if I had more time. I used it a bit, but university engineering courses are really intense and I was barely keeping up. :(

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microprocessor programming, eh?  Sounds difficult.  Is that programming microcode like the stuff we've seen recently with Spectre and Intel's fixes?

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The only book kept from my late student days on account of its handy size is the Pocket Guide Assembly language for the 68000 Series. Very handy, but sadly not available anymore (at least in this locale) but Google Books do suggest a library. In any case there's a copy here. :P

These days, it's so much better with an IDE isn't it? Visual MASM or Easy Code. Tried MASM a few years ago- but couldn't make anything work at all. It looks like a much better program now. :)

 

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Thanks for all the links peoples.  I am enjoying Python at the moment.  I'm a slow learner, but making steady progress.  Trying too many languages at once will cause my brain to overheat and melt down...

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Well, I'm focusing on Python 3.x.x and Bash is written in 2.x but most syntax should be similar.  But, I'm a long ways away from contributing to something like Bash.  One never knows what the future will bring, of course...

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If you do look at it, I’d poke about quietly. As soon as the community finds out someone else is looking at Bash, you’ll probably get inundated. :lmao:

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Posted (edited)

Sorry for the double post.  I was frustrated.  Breach of etiquette.  I shall castrate myself before the country.

Edited by Malonn

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6 hours ago, Visceral Moonlight said:

I think you mean forum. :D

I like my puns. :P

Lol.

 

Python has built-in modules with tons of functions.  Let me ask you programmers a question that has the potential to make me feel better: do pro's have to consult documentation from time to time?  I just don't see myself getting to the point that I won't need to reference the official docs for help.

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1 hour ago, Malonn said:

Lol.

 

Python has built-in modules with tons of functions.  Let me ask you programmers a question that has the potential to make me feel better: do pro's have to consult documentation from time to time?  I just don't see myself getting to the point that I won't need to reference the official docs for help.

Ok, here’s my opportunity for a pro tip: don’t memorize anything. Just take note of the fact that the language has a sort function, for example. Look up the syntax when you want to use it.

At my age, there’d be no way I could program if I memorized the syntax of every command! That goes for Oblivion scripting especially. Actually I don’t even have all the functions memorized. I just note that there usually is a function to do something and I try to remember the search terms so I can find it again. :P

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6 minutes ago, AndalayBay said:

At my age, there’d be no way I could program if I memorized the syntax of every command! That goes for Oblivion scripting especially. Actually I don’t even have all the functions memorized. I just note that there usually is a function to do something and I try to remember the search terms so I can find it again. :P

So, you could keep us posted about your activity. :P

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