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Visceral Moonlight

Tech Advice and Stuffz

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I need some advice here so I figured I'd throw this thread up to help hold future questions and stuff. :)Anyways, I need to get myself a cable modem and I have no idea what to look for. No wireless features are needed, I'll be plugging in a coax cable from the wall into the modem and then an Ethernet cable into the modem and, from there, to my computer.

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I would just do some searches and have a look at various reviews. Top 5 or 10 lists can be helpful.You might also want to look at getting a router so that you can hook up more than one machine to the modem.I don't worry about modems too much. I just buy whatever my ISP has to offer. My ISP is a small independent company so they offer good stuff. Our modem is a TP-Link. Our previous one was a Multi-tech. No issues with either one.

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Looking over their products, it doesn't appear that any of them have a way to connect from a coaxial cable to the modem or am I missing something?I have three routers already, actually. I just want to have a wired connection for the computer.I'd use powerline adapters but all of my outlets are currently in use or not in an easy to reach place.And, yeah, I'll probably do some searching around and such. I just like to get others' thoughts on this kind of thing when I haven't a clue on it.

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Why are you using coax cable? I haven't used that for networking for 13 years, surely the connection from the wall should by RJ45?

The cable company here uses the lines to provide both TV and Internet service. :shrug:

Actually you can use both connections and I've used the coax cable for the last 10 years, but now I use a network cable and I had no choice than to use a network cable for my broadband modem or a gateway as my ISP provider equip their customer.

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Yikes. You would need to find a modem that accepts coax then. Or contact your cable company and see if they can upgrade the jack.

 

I do remember seeing some modems that have coax. Just did a search - yeah, a lot of them still offer a coax connector. They'll often call it an F connector, or RF connector.

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You know I actually have my old broadband modem laying around in my apartment and collecting a lot of dust.  Anyway...  It's a Motorola broadband and there is connections for both cable types (coax, RJ45) plus an USB port.

 

So if you find a Motorola SB4200E SURFBroard Cable Modem then you may have all three connection types (coax, RJ45, USB), but hardware specifics can be a little different for us in Sweden than it's for the people who live in North America.

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My second hard drive is failing. It's the same model as the one that failed last year. Fortunately I bought a large Western Digital and I was able to copy all my files off the failing drive.

 

When you're looking for a new hard drive, definitely have a look at the reviews and see which brand is the most reliable at the moment. It varies. Currently Western Digital is leading the pack. They also offer a five year warranty, which is something you want to look for.

 

Even the solid state drives can fail, so do a bit of research and don't skimp. The cheapest drives are probably going to cost you in the end. :)

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I've used Western Digital in the past, but when a WD HDD crashed at the same time was playing Nascar Racing 2003 I decided not use WD HDD anymore.  Since then I've been using Seagate (Barrcuda) HDD and I'm satisfied.

 

Besides I'm favor HDD that's so silent that I need to put my hand to chassi to convenince myself the HDD is working by its vibrations.

Edited by Leonardo

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As I said, it varies. I've had two Seagates die on me now. The cheaper A series only lasted a couple of years. I replaced it with an N series that has a 5 year warranty. Both of my N series drives failed just after the warranty expired. Now to be fair, only the A series had a catastrophic failure in which I had to pay to get the data recovered. It was a spindle failure. The other two drives had issues with bad sectors. Once I got the data off them and reformatted them, they were fine.

 

There will be years in which Seagates are more reliable. Then it seems to switch for a while. Right now WD seems to be more reliable.

 

My WD is also 10,000 rpm, so it's pretty quick. :) It doesn't seem to be any louder than the Seagates.

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I wasn't aware they came in different colours. Some companies are offering energy efficient components. Do you think that's what they mean by the "green" drive?I did some searches for the most reliable drive and WD seemed to come out on top this time around. Then I just look at the specs and the warranty. I decided on a 10,000 rpm drive for better performance for my games. I plan to buy an SSD for the OS when I build a new machine.

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Yeah, "Green" usually refers to lower powered and lower performance drives. From the looking I did, Western Digital drives come in "Blue", "Red", "Green", and "Black" varieties and I'm not sure what the differences are outside of "Green".I don't need something as fast as 10000 RPM, 7200 RPM suits my needs just fine. I'm not picky when it comes to that sort of thing. Plus, it really drives the cost up and with the way I hoard data, I figure having a lot of space wouldn't hurt. :P

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Okay, so - just bought a new hard drive.  2TB instead of 500GB. 

 

My question before I go ahead and stick it in:  Would you suggest I use it for the main or the backup (I don't recall the speed of my old harddrive, btw)?  If we go with main, should I clone my current HD over (recommended software?), or just reinstall Win7 on the new one (I have a registered copy) and move things around?  And what's the chances that DS will suggest I use Linux instead (100% or 110%)?

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With the right software (don't know any, I'd just reinstall Windows), cloning is quicker and easier, but a fresh reinstall is cleaner and healthier (but requires remembering everything previously installed so you can check for the latest versions and reinstall them all). The faster drive (whichever that is) would be better for Windows install, but if you tend to install games on another drive then the faster drive may be better for the game installs.

 

Did that help?

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And what's the chances that DS will suggest I use Linux instead (100% or 110%)?

I'm not falling for that one...Anyways, I'd use the smaller drive until you need the space on the larger drive while making sure to back up the important stuff either on the larger drive or somewhere else.As for disk speed, you can get that in Windows by right-clicking on "Computer" -> Properties -> View System Information -> Print All (or similar; it doesn't actually print it, it just shows even more information).

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And what's the chances that DS will suggest I use Linux instead (100% or 110%)?

I'm not falling for that one...Anyways, I'd use the smaller drive until you need the space on the larger drive while making sure to back up the important stuff either on the larger drive or somewhere else.As for disk speed, you can get that in Windows by right-clicking on "Computer" -> Properties -> View System Information -> Print All (or similar; it doesn't actually print it, it just shows even more information).

 

 

That doesn't work in Win 7. :P

 

I actually haven't found a way to get the drive speed from Windows. I can get it to list the model number, then I take that and Google it. I'll find the vendor specs page and that lists the speed and other details.

 

Ama, I'd be inclined to use the new drive as a secondary drive. If it's faster than your old one, then it might be worth making it your primary drive and installing Windows on it. Then your old drive would be a secondary drive and you could copy your data from it.

 

I prefer a small fast drive for my Windows partition. Then the large drives for data and programs. I don't install any programs to my C: drive, except for a few in which I don't have any choice in the matter. I believe you can actually move your Program Files folder, but I didn't bother doing that. I did however relocate my Documents folder.

 

My motivation for doing all that is that I intend to get an SSD for my boot drive. They are expensive so I don't want to get anything larger than 120 GB. Therefore I need to install all my programs elsewhere. Now that I've gotten used to relocating everything, I find it more convenient anyway.

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And what's the chances that DS will suggest I use Linux instead (100% or 110%)?

I'm not falling for that one...Anyways, I'd use the smaller drive until you need the space on the larger drive while making sure to back up the important stuff either on the larger drive or somewhere else.As for disk speed, you can get that in Windows by right-clicking on "Computer" -> Properties -> View System Information -> Print All (or similar; it doesn't actually print it, it just shows even more information).

 

 That doesn't work in Win 7. :P I actually haven't found a way to get the drive speed from Windows. I can get it to list the model number, then I take that and Google it. I'll find the vendor specs page and that lists the speed and other details.

 

Just goes to show you how long it's been since I worked with Windows. :PI do remember pulling it up somehow in one of the system information areas. I'll need to play around with that in a few weeks, it looks like...

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